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Greenhouse Roofing Materiels

Discussion in 'Greenhouse - Shade house.' started by gudgeon, Apr 8, 2010.

  1. trout

    trout New Member

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    Forgot to tell you

    the metal hoops to cover 5m span cost $50 each.
    placed 2m apart.

    I don't think it's worth trying to make your own unless your making 20 or so


    cheers Lou
     
  2. Erich

    Erich Member

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    Pretty good actually

    Got a link for these or did you have em made (if yes, what out of and thickness :) )
     
  3. fishfood

    fishfood Active Member

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  4. trout

    trout New Member

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    www.monbulkrural.com.au

    their website isn't real flash

    They make them on the premises, I didn't buy them.
    I made my own hence I feel I'm an expert when I say
    buy them.

    They use a bender that's probably worth 5-6 thousand dollars
    hence each is exactly perfect.

    If you try to make them the first two or three you would need to discard
    until you gain some experience.
    furthermore the the cost of the tube (think it was 25mm tube ) would
    cost $30.00.

    The time and effort involved your better off buying them.

    Regardless Monbulk is too far away for you, look up the yellow pages
    for greenhouse suppliers in an area with a lot of growers that use greenhouses.

    since they buy their film at 1000 m at a time it's cheaper then
    your local nursery. Also they're out in the country where people seem
    to be more honest. Ooops am I allowed to say that?

    cheers Lou
     
  5. RupertofOZ

    RupertofOZ New Member

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    Of course you are Lou.... and I'd hope that we would all.... and bring to an end the spin & bull**** of the "sophisticated" end of town... where lies & dishonesty have become twisted into acceptable business presentation... :D
     
  6. Yabbies4me

    Yabbies4me Administrator Staff Member

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    I've just spotted this thread, so I know the info is a bit late, but may be helpful for future reference.

    Supposedly the colour of the shadecloth affects the growth rate and internodal stretch of plants, according to the "experts", white is the best.

    I am a horticultralist and for a few years I worked as head groundsperson at a TAFE college that taught horticulture, it had a large shadehouse covered in green shadecloth. One day some boffin from the science dept, a botanist, decided the green had to go, they removed the green shadecloth and replaced it with white, it cost them thousands.

    They assured me the plants would be healthier and the shadehouse would be slightly cooler. I wasn't part of thier experiments or testing, so I don't know what the outcome was, but there must've been some science behind it.
     
  7. Erich

    Erich Member

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    id like some further info on this.

    My understanding is the same (from weekend country gardening shows on the radio). They suggest - generally 50% or 30% WHITE is the go - not green

    Anyone with their thoughts? Does it have to do with locality?
     
  8. Yabbies4me

    Yabbies4me Administrator Staff Member

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  9. Erich

    Erich Member

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    lol - where is green and black then ;)
     
  10. Yabbies4me

    Yabbies4me Administrator Staff Member

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    Was just reading on another site that black and green are no no's!
     
  11. Erich

    Erich Member

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    lol - I have no real idea on colours but the cool kids say white is the magic colour ;)
     
  12. rohan

    rohan New Member

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    I'm going laserlite but not the clear stuff but a lighter shade than black. However this is based primarily on future uses of the area should we sell. Definately shade cloth on the sides to keep the critters out.

    Regards Ro.
     
  13. Tdsal2

    Tdsal2 New Member

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    Amen to that brother..
     
  14. rohan

    rohan New Member

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    Alright if the cool kids say white, then white it is.
     
  15. Erich

    Erich Member

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    2 weeks ago, I was listening on the radio (1395 in Adelaide) on one of those gardening shows. A dude came on who runs a major shade business speaking about this.

    With white vs green shade-cloth etc, it basically comes down to white having a better light for photosynthesis etc, it does not give the sun light coming through a false green tinge like green does and the plants respond to white light a lot better. 50% seems to be a good grade unless it really gets hot then 70 seems to suit.

    There are also colors like red, blue, yellow etc and they do different things like either slow down growth, fruiting or speed it up etc
     
  16. trout

    trout New Member

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    When I bought my greenhouse materials a couple of months ago they
    gave me 50% white shade cloth.
    They didn't even ask if I wanted a different colour.
    That's what they sell to all the commercial growers in the area.
    They had heaps of it, getting ready for summer.
    It seems to be the industry standard.
     
  17. riverman

    riverman New Member

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    Shade House

    Murray,

    This is Riverman (ted) from Arkansas in the US. I was with you when you came to the California. While we were there, we visited Ron's greenhouse which had a one layer thick white greenhouse cover. While it was much thicker than most covers and he was not using a shade cloth...

    In Arkansas where I am building my greenhouse, we had several days (20+) where the temperature reached over 100f this past summer. In the dome greenhouse I am building, I was planning on using is a two cover system with air blown between the two sheets. I was planning on adding shade cloth on the inside of the greenhouse during the heat of the summer...

    Which do you think would be best...one thick layer that I could add shade cloth to the outside during the summer or a two layer system with air blown between for added insulation then adding shade cloth to the inside during the summer?

    Thanks for any input!
     
  18. Murray

    Murray Site Admin Staff Member

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    Hi Ted,
    Most greenhouses here in Aussie use the single layer plastic with a removable shade cloth over the top in summer. The double skin type is most beneficial in cold climates as an insulator. I am told by our greenhouse supplier that heat is best dealt with by using the shade cloth and additionally the use of misters as we saw in Ron's greenhouse.
    The misters will give a 5 degree C drop in temp if the relative humidity is low....not so much as the relative humidity rises.
     

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