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Diseased Leaves?

Discussion in 'Plants' started by adam.francis, Dec 6, 2010.

  1. adam.francis

    adam.francis New Member

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    this picture is of my cucumber plant.. somethings wrong here.. none of my other plants are like this.. maybe the cucumber cant cope with the indoor conditions?

    what do you think?

    adam
     

    Attached Files:

  2. Bluegill

    Bluegill Member

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    downy mildew

    Adam...this looks a lot like downy mildew.
    Itl common in cucs and squash as a real pesky fungal disease.
    I have used compost tea to control it on my regular soil garden when I had one.
    But some of my organic buddies use neem oil and love it....is organic but I dont know how it would affect your fish....ph and such..

    Darryl
     
  3. adam.francis

    adam.francis New Member

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    thanks for the info D!
     
  4. trout

    trout New Member

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    Hi all

    I've not used neem oil before but from previous threads in the forum
    it is to be used with caution.
    So if you're going to try using it don't spray it but paint it onto the leaves and possibly cover your media so as to catch any drops.
    We tend to use Pot Bicarb usually sold ad Eco Rose in Aust or
    I think is called Greencure in the States (but please check). Apparenty some organic rose gardeners use Greencure/Drammatic K together with good success. Drammatic K is a fish oil (not emulsion). If you're going to use this you will need to read the labels carefully just in case there are other ingredients as we don't have these products in Aust and I don't have first hand experience.

    Cheers Lou
     
  5. Hotrodmike

    Hotrodmike New Member

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    Jul 16, 2010
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    Adam
    I have used Neem oil for years with about everything in the garden and around the house from all the pets to use for skin conditioner and it is great stuff . Like Lou kind of noted it is very toxic to fish . So do keep that in mind
    Have A Kind Day
    Mike
     
  6. RupertofOZ

    RupertofOZ New Member

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    You can probably source Potassium BiCarbonate from any wine making supply shop...

    And it does work well on powdery mildew...

    Another alternative is a "full cream" milk spray... skim milk doesn't cut it...
     
  7. JohnDDuff

    JohnDDuff Member

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    Country:
    Australia
    State:
    Queensland
    City:
    Toowoomba
    Adam,
    How cold is it in your AP system/glasshouse as cucrbits don't like the cold. It doesn't look like downy mildew to me as DM should start of with small yellow spots on the leaves. Phosphorus acid is good against DM but Ithink it is harmful to fish or so the label of some of the products suggests. Oil based products may be your best option as this would coat the fungal spores preventing them from germinating. we have Eco-Oil or synetrol hort oil which are canola based products. Not too sure what you have over there. All the best.
     
  8. Bluegill

    Bluegill Member

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    You could also get a small brush...like the type used to paint by numbers.....and coat one leaf as a control with polyethylene glycol....(antifreeze).....not the old antifreeze which is ethylene glycol but polyethylene glycol...and fungus cannot grow in the prescence of it...it will stop wood rot cold...let the wood dry and spray it on...theny let that dry and paint it or fiberglass over it.....no more rot.....
    Also stops athletics foot.....
    Anyway, maybe it will kill the fungus on the leaf....I wouldnt spray a lot on the plant though....
    Is that crazy or what?
     
  9. adam.francis

    adam.francis New Member

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    its an indoor system so its fairly warm.. also, it did start off with brownish spots...

    I decided to yank them anyways.. being an indoor system I accepted that i cant ask for the world.. unless i wanted to start paying some nice hydro bills...

    i came to the conclusion that only leafy greens are the way to go indoors! :D
     
  10. trout

    trout New Member

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    Adam

    You give up too easily, I've just managed to get on top of the fungal problems I've had.
    My problem was that in the greenhouse I hadn't figured for ventilation.
    Once I opened it up and got some air in there and hit it hard with
    Pot Bicarb I'm on top of it. You may need some ventilation (small fan)

    Try planting some peppers, fennel, beetroot etc but don't limit yourself to only leafy greens (after a while they get boring).

    Aquaponics is still relatively new so we all need to experiment to add
    to the knowledge base. We need to push the limit to see what we can
    achieve (reference to Wendy BC new thread).

    So keep the enthusiasm up

    cheers Lou
     
  11. Yabbies4me

    Yabbies4me Administrator Staff Member

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    Country:
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    Yep!... You may not want to loose too much heat, but a small amount of ventilation bringing fresh air in and evacuating the humid stale air would definitely help. Passive air intake is the simplest and cheapest ie: a small extraction fan mounted high, sucking air out of your growing area and vents to allow air in, supplemented with an oscillating fan to keep the air moving around and the leaves of the plants moving, it only needs to be gentle movement.

    You can turn the extraction fan off in the coldest parts of the day.
    .
     
  12. adam.francis

    adam.francis New Member

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    hey..

    well.. i've had 2 fans going strong.. and the plants are where my furnace is, so i took the door off and opened some ducts.. seems to be alot of movement?

    my cherry tomato plant is doing great and actually starting to flower!

    i took them out not because i was giving up.. i just didnt want to over do it in such a small area and once those plants all get big it might turn into a grow op in here :tongue:.. and mold is no good for anyone..
     

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