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something OTHER than talapia?

Discussion in 'What Fish is that ?' started by oceansgreen, Jun 10, 2011.

  1. oceansgreen

    oceansgreen New Member

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    Jun 9, 2011
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    i like the taste of talapia myself but was wondering what else might work in an aquaponics system?


    also, assuming i had a system that was about 4-5ft tall of the ground and also had at least a couple feet underground as well, will the tilapia go that deep? or would talapia and prawn work alone?
    or should i also get another fish for the bottom of the tank? if so, what kind of EDIBLE fish are there that would do well on the bottom of the tank at that depth?
    while i want something that is edible, i am also wanting to set up a system such that i don't have to put any BOUGHT food into it, i can raise duckweed and worms, possibly soldier flies as well, but i don't really wanna buy much fish food, if any;)

    thx for any help or info:)
     
  2. Murray

    Murray Site Admin Staff Member

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    Country:
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    Aquaponics will work with almost any fish. If you don't want to use Tilapia then you need to find out from your local State Fisheries Department what fish you are allowed to keep in your state. It is pretty much up to you what you want to raise. Some just use gold fish.

    What you feed the fish is dependant on the fish type. That is why Tilapia are such a great fish. They will eat a large variety of things.

    Kellen will be able to better inform you on Tilapia and there may be some members on this forum who are from your state.
     
  3. kellenw

    kellenw Member

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    Hello Oceansgreen,

    Tilapia will do just fine in shallow or fairly deep water, so no worries there.

    As far as other species, you could look into bluegill, yellow perch or trout. What USDA zone are you in?
     
  4. oceansgreen

    oceansgreen New Member

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    zone 4
    but my first system will be an indoors setup

    i was just looking for other varieties of edible fish

    the crrent tank i will be transforming has cichlids, a turtle, and a sucker fish
     
  5. kellenw

    kellenw Member

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    Sounds good! :)
     
  6. silkcom

    silkcom New Member

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    You might also want to look into doing catfish. They live very well in crazy temperatures. They aren't however as easy to breed as tilapia, just easier to keep alive when it gets cold :). But doing it indoors that might not make much of a difference. Indoors, if you can find them, you might even be able to do some jade perch, I wonder if we're able to find those here in the states.
     
  7. snapperG

    snapperG New Member

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    I'd give hybrid bluegill a try. They are aggresive feeders and grow quickly. I'm about 2 1/2 months into my first system and the bluegills are doing great. I've lost 2 out of 60 so they seem very hardy. Most fish hatcheries are selling these fingerlings. I think they taste better than tilapia.
     
  8. keith_r

    keith_r Member

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    more recent studies are showing the while hybrid bluegill may do a little better the first year, growth is pretty even.. selective breeding of "pure" strain bluegill has been yielding outstanding results... google "condello strain bluegill"
    some of they hybrid talk is hype.. one of the reason pond meisters's like them is their low reproductive rates, since about 90 to 95% are male..
     
  9. kellenw

    kellenw Member

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    Bruce Condello (developer of the Condello strain BG) is a great guy... and a fantastic fisherman too. :)
     
  10. snapperG

    snapperG New Member

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    Thanks for the info about the pure strain. I guess I chose hybrid bluegill because I know they will be plate size a lot quicker.
     
  11. kellenw

    kellenw Member

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    It's unlikely you'll see much if any difference.
     

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