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Organic

Discussion in 'Gardening Discussion - Other gardening systems.' started by adz, Apr 8, 2016.

  1. adz

    adz Member

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    Hi guys
    So someone said to me yesterday that there is no proof that organic food is better for you. So I did some googling and to me its like the smoking debate years ago, designed to create doubt. Does anyone have a good reference which proves it.

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    Last edited: Apr 8, 2016
  2. Murray

    Murray Site Admin Staff Member

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    Depends on what is important to you. Organic or naturally grown is free from dangerous, human harmful chemicals.....that has to be good.
    Organic produce should be, and usually is grown with a very strong bias to making sure the soil, or media system is biologically active containing all the nutrients needed for nutrient dense human food. Food plants, to be healthy and nutritionally dense need much more than just NPK.
     
    gpk likes this.
  3. bigdaddy

    bigdaddy Super Moderator

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    Hi adz,

    I think Organic, sugar and fats, more so, are all like the smoking debate years ago. Plus we get ticks from the heart foundation that can bought by big business.
    Some people think it is good to buy from farmers markets...I'm not sure about that one as it is very difficult to regulate them. Although I enjoy going to them anyway.
    What about this one? Sustainable energy?

    BOT. There is a difference between organic and certified organic foods.
    Organic can be anything with no strict regulations...Cerified organic is a different story.

    If you grow cerified organic food you would of outlayed considerable time and expense to be able to grow your produce to the way the regulations etc state. If you are found breaking any of those laws you can have your organic cetifercation taken away from you and it would be illegal to sell your produce as certified organic. I do not think certified organic growers want that...

    Cheers
     
  4. Ringer

    Ringer Active Member

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    Hi Adz,
    "Organic" can mean different things to different people.
    Organic methods of food production are important to me as I know the food is being produced in a sustainable way with minimum impact on the environment.
    Large scale cropping can be very destructive and wasteful .
    Cheers
     
  5. DoreenRobSouthFL USA

    DoreenRobSouthFL USA New Member

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    3 Reasons Modern Farming Practices Should Be Certified Organic

    Did you know that the National Organic Standards Board (a Federal Advisory Board within the USDA) is considering a ban of modern farming techniques like hydroponics, aquaponics, and aeroponics from being certified organic?

    That means that modern farmers like yourself who are investing in systems that conserve resources and allow you to grow healthier, locally grown crops closer to where people live, could soon lose the opportunity to be certified organic.

    We here at Upstart University think that’s absurd and we’re taking action to ensure modern farmers like you have the ability to put an organic label on your product packaging!

    In this post, we’ll look at 3 reasons why modern, soilless farming techniques should be certified organic.

    It seems I'm not allowed yet to post with links... Oh my
     
  6. DoreenRobSouthFL USA

    DoreenRobSouthFL USA New Member

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    1) Soilless grown produce is safe, nutritious and grown locally, just like consumers deserve!
    The Organic label was created to signify safety, sustainability, and responsibility in food. Consumers depend on the organic label to help them identify food that is:

    • Free of unsafe or unhealthy pesticides and fertilizers
    • Resource efficient with effective cycling and recycling of inputs through the farm
    • Free from harmful impacts to the air, water, and surrounding land.
    • Created in humane and healthy conditions
    And, as you know, modern farming techniques like hydroponic and aquaponic production can fit right into these criteria, yet they’re on the chopping block!

    One great example of how hydroponics and aquaponics support responsible resource use and nutritious food is the decrease in food miles. Hydroponic and aquaponic systems can be built indoors or in greenhouses in/near cities, enabling fresh produce to be grown close to the consumer all year round, eliminating hundreds or thousands of miles of transportation.

    This is different than most conventional soil farms, whether they’re certified organic or not.

    Conventional soil farms need a lot of space, a lot of resources like water and labor, and healthy, unpolluted soil – all of which are difficult to find near or even in cities where people live!

    That means they typically have to truck in their produce from much further than modern, soilless farms do – which increases the time between harvest and consumption. And as the Harvard T.H. Chan Center for Public Health reports:

    Even when the highest post-harvest handling standards are met, foods grown far away spend significant time on the road, and therefore have more time to lose nutrients before reaching the marketplace.” (1)

    When food is grown regionally or locally using indoor hydroponics and aquaponics, the consumer gets a richer nutritional profile, and the environment benefits from a shorter supply chain.

    The bottom line: hydroponics and aquaponics (i.e. soilless growing techniques) can actually deliver a better crop to market because of their proximity to where people live and their sustainable use of resources.
     
  7. DoreenRobSouthFL USA

    DoreenRobSouthFL USA New Member

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    2) Soilless farming contributes positively to the economy and strengthens food security by bringing farms closer to where people live!
    Modern farmers, empowered with appropriate tools and technology, are able to grow food in areas where fresh, local food has never been possible before (and bring jobs and opportunities along with them).

    Doing so gives more people better access to nutritious food in previously unthinkable, ungrowable locations, like:

    1) Urban food deserts like cities where land prices are high and areas with good soil are scarce.

    2) Northern latitudes with harsh climates (e.g. Alaska) where the vast majority of food is shipped in and therefore lacks freshness.

    3) Areas that lack abundant ground and surface water where conventional produce farms don’t stand a chance.

    Modern growing techniques not only help grow food closer to where people live, they also help a new generation of farmers make a living doing what they love – growing good food!

    Whether in an urban or rural location, farmers today face difficult growing conditions and even more difficult economics, and they need an edge to be successful. Controlled Environment Agriculture (CEA) – growing in greenhouses or indoor environments with resource-conscious techniques – allows more people to grow food and access markets.(3)

    Even the former Secretary of Agriculture, Tom Vilsack, understands the power of fostering stronger local food economies saying:

    “Urban agriculture helps strengthen the health and social fabric of communities while creating economic opportunities for farmers and neighborhoods.”

    As part of the Upstart University community, you know this better than most. That’s because modern growers like you are helping to bring better food to those who want it and need it, regardless of where they live!

    The bottom line: Evolved agricultural methods like hydroponics and aquaponics make farming more accessible, strengthen local economies, and supply fresher food to those who deserve it.
     
  8. DoreenRobSouthFL USA

    DoreenRobSouthFL USA New Member

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    3) Conventional soil-based farming doesn’t have a monopoly on microbiology and healthy food.
    Many anti-hydroponic and anti-aquaponic activists cite the lack of sun and soil as a major defect of the growing methods. After all, the soil is alive, and science has shown that plants grow better with the rich communities of microbes that give it life. If hydroponics uses rocks or coconuts husks or recycled plastic to grow, then it must be sterile, right?

    Wrong.

    What traditionalists fail to acknowledge is that microbes can thrive anywhere there is water, habitat, and nutrition for them. And unfortunately, the anti-hydroponic activists take advantage of the fact that most members of the general public do not have a degree in microbiology.

    By using words like “unnatural, sterile, Robo-crops,” they deliberately try to confuse the public about the realities of evolved farming technics like hydroponic or aquaponic production methods.

    That’s why it’s up to all of us who see the promise of modern technology that’s helping feed more people better food to set the record straight!

    Much to the dismay of traditionalists, aquaponic and hydroponic systems are actually their own ecosystems teeming with life. In fact, studies show that Organic aquaponic and hydroponic production relies on a robust microflora in the root zone – made of the same types and numbers of bacteria and fungi that thrive in soil. These interactions and economies of microorganisms and plants are what makes them work so well.

    The bottom line: While amazing in their own right, the soil and the sun hold no mystical powers and are not required to grow healthy, delicious food for our growing population. And, soilless systems take a deep understanding of microbiology (as well as other plant/physical sciences) and weave it into something that can grow organic food better.
    **By the way, Many, if not Most aquaponic growers use real, natural sunlight, albeit filtered in a greenhouse. Majority of hydroponics are indoors and/or use chemical fertilizers & pest control. But soil is not a necessary component to be organic, and should not be in order to be certified as such.

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