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Anyone grown Tomatoes Perennially?

Discussion in 'Gardening Discussion - Other gardening systems.' started by Danscraft, Jul 24, 2014.

  1. Danscraft

    Danscraft VIP Supporter

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    Country:
    Australia
    State:
    South East Victoria
    City:
    Frankston
    Just asking because I have cut down Tomato vines to near the ground in my Aquaponics systems, but they have great new baby shoots from the low stems. Its past Solstice, days are getting longer..
    I've grown chilies, some are 3 years old now. They are often taken as annual because they are often developed in more tropical climates and would die in winters like in Victoria. But I have learnt to (Green House) them in the colder months and cut them down to stems like you would with Roses eg. Then come Spring (reborn) they grow out again baring many fruit.
    Will Tomatoes do this too?

    I've torn most of them out I may just leave one plant as experiment. :geek:
     
    Last edited: Jul 24, 2014
  2. Robert123

    Robert123 Active Member

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    Yes, tomatoes are perennials and can grow for multiple years (how many I am not sure) but you'll likely need a greenhouse if your outdoor temps at some time during the year would kill the plant. I've had tomatoes producing year round in my AP beds. Even if you don't want to keep the same plant going (the stems get massive), but you can certainly root a new plant from a cutting off the old and in that way keep the fires burning so to speak without resorting back to seed. Problem I ran into was that the tomato plants just took over the bed as the grew (roots went crazy) AND those plants are nutrient hogs. I've now ripped them all out of the beds. Think next effort on AP tomatoes will utilize a wicking bed setup in the designs.

    NOTE: I've posted it elsewhere here, but during the winter I had to shake the plants by hand to get the blossoms to pollinate. Suspect that was due to the high humidity in the greenhouse from the heated fish tanks causing the pollen to be sticky. Without the shaking I had beautiful blossoms but the plants never bared fruit.

    2nd NOTE: Basil and many (if not all) types of peppers will grow well from cuttings too. AP is a great way to utilize this technique of plant propagation.
     
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  3. Danscraft

    Danscraft VIP Supporter

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    Excellent. Thanks Robert. Yes I may chose to rip the last one out too because the roots have gone crazy, growing like a blanket on top of the gravel where the water flows in, even growing into the pipe and blocking the flow! I just like the idea of having a head start for the coming spring. I'll try some cuttings like you mentioned.
    The plants where still growing really well but creating a canopy without producing many more fruit. Then the fruit it does have doesn't quite ripen and some go bad even when they are still green.
    I've now got 3kg green and orange tomatoes to pickle.
    Cheers.
     
  4. Murray

    Murray Site Admin Staff Member

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    Tomatoes will keep going for a very long time if you prune them well, especially the cherry, indeterminate types such as "Amish Paste" I have excellent success with this particular variety. Purchased seed 5 or 6 years ago and have just kept reseeding through generations of fruit.
     
  5. yoodles

    yoodles VIP Supporter

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    ive still got them fruiting, all be it very slowly and its really cold down here in the adelaide hills ...
    but im re designing and ill do my tomato's and chillies in dutch buckets so they dont clog the growbeds and i can then just move them around
     

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